August 15, 2012


This is great! I worked for a local boutique in one of these spaces making jewelry and learning about running your own business, it was an incredible space with great energy and incredibly cool neighbors! (It’s St. Paul after all, I wouldn’t expect anything less;)
fastcompany:


“I remember that very deeply in my soul back in 1986, we felt that was unfair,” says Kelley Lindquist, who became the president of a nonprofit called Artspace in 1987. “It was insulting for people to sometimes say, ‘Oh, artists like to move, they’re bohemians!’ Who likes to be on the street and renegotiate a lease and carry all their equipment and try to create a new community and basically start all over?”

The Key To A Thriving Creative Class? Give Artists Their Own Real Estate Developers 
It worked for St. Paul, Minnesota, where artists revived an old warehouse district—and got to stick around to reap the benefits of what they helped create.

This is great! I worked for a local boutique in one of these spaces making jewelry and learning about running your own business, it was an incredible space with great energy and incredibly cool neighbors! (It’s St. Paul after all, I wouldn’t expect anything less;)

fastcompany:

“I remember that very deeply in my soul back in 1986, we felt that was unfair,” says Kelley Lindquist, who became the president of a nonprofit called Artspace in 1987. “It was insulting for people to sometimes say, ‘Oh, artists like to move, they’re bohemians!’ Who likes to be on the street and renegotiate a lease and carry all their equipment and try to create a new community and basically start all over?”

The Key To A Thriving Creative Class? Give Artists Their Own Real Estate Developers

It worked for St. Paul, Minnesota, where artists revived an old warehouse district—and got to stick around to reap the benefits of what they helped create.

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